Moving To The Cloud

For some interesting reading, range about the Internet for articles detailing the way the software world has changed in the past few years with the success of companies like Facebook and similarly ubiquitous, social-node technologies. Those companies have fostered the advent of the DevOps strategy, which is more a paradigm shift in corporate culture than merely a mechanical development/quality assurance/deployment strategy, and it demonstrates a new way of thinking about deployment scaling using the cloud (with an unbelievable number of servers available) while maintaining an aggressive development schedule. Sprint-cycle application development and cloud-based deployment are the order of the day for these newer entities. No longer does dev sit in a development cycle of a year or more, but rather a cycle that is measured in months at most, or weeks – even days. Getting customer-requested features quickly into the product and out to the customers is still job one, but – Oh, hey! – the difference in implementation! Ben Horowitz Article “How Software Testing Has Changed”
Continue reading

Please don’t make this mistake in your business. It will RUIN you.

This is so true…lest we forget the importance of feedback, especially from our customer.

Please don’t make this mistake in your business. It will RUIN you.

by Derek Halpern | Follow Him on Twitter Here

Every now and then, you stumble on something that makes you want to hit your head against the wall.

And it’s often when people make a large, glaring mistake. A mistake that should be self explanatory, but they make it anyway.

Here’s the full story…

Over on Facebook, I republished my video about why I think discounting is for idiots. And someone shared their opinion of my video:

bob

Now this is remarkable.

First, let’s talk about the big elephant in the room. They tell me I’m an idiot, and that they suggest businesses LIE to their customers.

But that’s not even the main point.

Instead, they’re not paying any mind to what I’m sharing because they don’t agree with it.

I’m not surprised by this though. There’s something known as selective exposure theory in psychology, and the long and short of it is: people look for information that affirms their pre-existing beliefs instead of contradicts them.

Now here’s the thing:

The mistake I’m sharing with you today has nothing to do with discounting. And it has nothing to do with lying.

Instead…

When you’re running your business, you should NEVER – and I mean NEVER – shoot down the advice of other people. Even if you think it doesn’t apply to you. Even if you think the other person is wrong.

Now this doesn’t mean you should believe everything you read.

Far from it.

I’m cynical. And skeptical. And everything I read, I take with a grain of salt. However, no matter how smart or dumb people sound, I always approach every scenario with the mindset of, “What can I learn from this?”

That’s why I read books about art history, copywriting, memoirs of fashion executives, and more.

Even if something doesn’t apply to me, I make it apply.

And that’s the secret.

If someone presents something to you that contracts what you know, you don’t have to change your mind and believe them. But you should ask yourself, “What do they know that I don’t?”

Even in this example, maybe they know something about discounting that I don’t. And even if they don’t, I still used their comments as a teachable moment for you.

So from this point forward, I implore you to never make the mistake this person made. I want you to use every experience as an opportunity to learn something new. Because in my experience, the best ideas comes from the dumbest things.

And I don’t want you to miss out on any of it.

Now here’s what I want you to do…

What’s one comment or critique you’ve received in your business (or life) that you didn’t agree with. How can you turn that into a teachable moment or a lesson? Leave a comment.

You can read the original article here.

Best Regards,

Robert Hughet
Quality Assurance Mgr.
ImageSource, Inc.

Steve Jobs and Promoting Insanely Great Software Quality

“You can’t just ask customers what they want and then try to give that to them. By the time you get it built, they’ll want something new.” (Steve Jobs, 1989)

“You‘ve got to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology – not the other way around.” (Steve Jobs, 1997)

“[If you’re lucky, when you grow up you’ll discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you and you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use.” (Steve Jobs, 1994)

steve-jobs-12-970x0

Few people in recent history have made the impression Steve Jobs did. He was a thunderous, hypersonic force in a world of (relatively speaking) slow-motion quiet, leaving behind a vibrant legacy of astonishing dimensions and changing not only the way people communicate, but the very way people think about communicating in the world of information interchange.

The first two quotes highlight the difficulty of transforming a process/idea into mass-marketable software. Further, they show that for the past twenty years or so, the process of building software has not changed appreciably. One can search the Internet, scanning for the one definitive article that outlines the perfect strategy and methodology for software development, marketing and deployment. With the millions of people working diligently the past twenty-plus years in the tech world to codify any and all matters, it seems that would be doable. OK. Go ahead and look. I’ll wait. And, if the past is any indicator of future performance, twenty years from now I’ll still be waiting and you’ll be howling, foaming-at-the-mouth mad, surrounded by seriously alarming piles of used, fermenting pizza boxes and empty soda bottles. And the only one who will still love you is your Mom. Maybe. Software development can be likened to being chased by a rabid Rottweiler while trying to catch an over-amped cat jonesing for tuna when you have one leg in a cast and the cat isn’t inclined to be caught and the Rottweiler seriously wants to turn your good leg into its new, favorite chew toy, you know? Continue reading

How to: Get Image Page Count in .NET C#

How to get image page count in .NET C#

private int GetTotalpages(string filePath)
{
int pageCount = 0;
using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{
using (Image temp = Image.FromStream(fs))
{
pageCount = temp.GetFrameCount(System.Drawing.Imaging.FrameDimension.Page);
}
}

return pageCount;
}

KyoungSu Do
Software Developer
ImageSource, Inc.

What Johnny Cash, stolen cars & software development have in common

“Now the headlights they was another sight
We had two on the left and one on the right
But when we pulled out the switch all three of ‘em come on.”
– Johnny Cash
“One Piece at a Time”

Many years ago, Johnny Cash sang a song called “One Piece at a Time”, in which he describes an automobile assembly plant worker stealing parts and pieces of various automobiles and assembling them into a very distinctive, one-of-a-kind car.

Given the nature of software, the essence of which is some form of code, building software is somewhat like putting that car together.  Technology evolves over time, operating systems change, and new tools all contribute to the complex process of building an application.  Code is pieced together in files and modules, and the output of the code in the form of log files and/or visual display on a monitor are the effects of the code.  When building an engine, putting on the heads and bolting up the crankshaft before attaching the pistons and connecting rods isn’t recommended.  Similarly, software designers aren’t always able to see all the parts until there is a basic framework constructed, and limitations of the system come to light.  Re-designing components and restructuring development schedules are not uncommon. Continue reading

New release versions of our ILINX products coming October 2013

Check out all of the new features in our upcoming release of ILINX products scheduled for “mid-late” October 2013.

Visit our website at: http://imagesourceinc.com/IlinxSoftware/index.htm for updates.

Windows Phone 8 Features Detail Leaks

If you have not seen the features list, check them out here.  I think the most important items from that list is the tight integration between Windows Phone and Windows, the desktop version.  According to various leaked info this layer will contain the kernel, networking stacks, security model, multi-core processor, and multimedia.

It would be interesting to see how much of it is true later this year.