Looking for an Oracle IPM replacement?

You have hundreds of thousands, maybe tens of millions, of documents in your old Oracle IPM 10g system with only 6 months before Oracle closes the support door on that product forever. Or maybe you’re running an Optika Acorde or Stellent IBPM system which has been out of support for years. You’ve looked at the new Oracle 11g platform and it’s too heavy, complex, and missing many key capabilities that you need, features like: external searching with Linked Servers, COLD support, Office and .NET integration points, easy setup and maintenance, and a workflow system that is actually usable for someone without a PhD. Oracle is clearly, and publically, going in a different direction and moving away from traditional enterprise imaging and transactional content management.

And even if you knew of an appropriate replacement technology, how are you going to migrate all of that content out of IPM without disrupting your business? What product vendor is going to know enough about your old IPM system to be able to get the content , applications, saved searches, workflows and profiles moved to their platform? Oh, and you don’t want simply to replacement on product for another – you want a good return on this migration investment!

ImageSource has been delivering and servicing Optika Acorde, Stellent IBPM, and Oracle IPM systems for nearly 20 years (don’t get me started on eMedia!). We recognized Oracle’s change in direction several years ago and have created the perfect replacement solution for the retiring 10g product. The ILINX suite offers the same content management capabilities as IPM but goes way beyond that. In fact, ILINX is more powerful, easier to deploy, use, and maintain, with better scalability, 100% browser-based, built-in retention management, more secure, free mobile clients, cloud-ready, built on the latest Microsoft technologies.. I could go on and on.

Check it out for yourself at www.ilinx.com

Join the dozens of other Oracle IPM customers that have made the easy switch to a better, more powerful ILINX solution!

Randy Weakly
VP of Software Development
ImageSource, Inc.

How To Add Or Change XML Encoding With .NET

Last time I wrote about comparing XML strings in .NET, and continuing that theme I’d like to discuss another handy XML trick.  As the last article pointed out, not all XML strings are created equal.  In fact, sometimes they are missing the necessary XML version and encoding information, like in the following sample XML:

<SampleXML>
    <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2 value="test value" />
    <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3>
</SampleXML>

Notice anything missing?   Yes, the declaration information is not at the start of the XML string.  Declaration information like in the below example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

Continue reading

How to Compare XML Strings Using .NET

So you want to compare two XML strings together to see if they are equal. Obviously, it would be easy to just compare the two strings using a regular string equality comparison and call it a day. However, what if the XML strings looked like the following:

<SampleXML>
    <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2 value="test value" />
    <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3>
</SampleXML>
<SampleXML>
        <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2     value="test value" />
        <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3></SampleXML>

All of the nodes, attributes and values are the same, but the formatting is way off. Obviously, a string equality comparison between these two would return false. Is there anything that can be done about this? Not to fear, .NET provides a pretty simple solution. Continue reading

How to: Get Image Page Count in .NET C#

How to get image page count in .NET C#

private int GetTotalpages(string filePath)
{
int pageCount = 0;
using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{
using (Image temp = Image.FromStream(fs))
{
pageCount = temp.GetFrameCount(System.Drawing.Imaging.FrameDimension.Page);
}
}

return pageCount;
}

KyoungSu Do
Software Developer
ImageSource, Inc.

Creating Case Insensitive Dictionaries In .NET

For millennia, mankind has looked to the stars and wondered, “How can I create a generic Dictionary in .NET that allows me use case insensitive strings as keys?” Well today that age old question will be answered with this neat trick.

Simply put, all you need to do is add a StringComparer object when constructing a generic Dictionary that uses a string key, and make sure to use on of the IgnoreCase StringComparers that are offered. Below is some sample code to illustrate just how easy this is.

// Create a generic dictionary with a string comparer that ignores case sensitivity.
//
// This includes the following:
//  - CurrentCultureIgnoreCase
//  - InvariantCultureIgnoreCase
//  - OrdinalIgnoreCase
Dictionary<string, string> stringMap = 
     new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
stringMap.Add("Test Key", "Some value");

// Now try to access or change the corresponding value with the key.
// The case of the key string no longer matters.
stringMap["test key"] = "This will work";
stringMap["TEST KEY"] = "And also this";
stringMap["tEsT kEy"] = "And this as well";
stringMap["tEST kEY"] = "And finally this";

// This can be done with any dictionary that uses a string as the key
Dictionary<string, int> numberMap = 
     new Dictionary<string, int>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
numberMap.Add("Test Key", 0);

// Same deal here, you can use any case to get or set the values in the map
numberMap["test key"] = 1;
numberMap["TEST KEY"] = 2;
numberMap["tEsT kEy"] = 3;
numberMap["tEST kEY"] = 4;

And that’s all there is to it.  I hope you enjoy and find this useful.

Richard Franzen
Developer
ImageSource, Inc.

Update UI controls form background worker

When you try to update an UI control from background worker, you might see this error message.

Cross-thread operation not valid: Control ‘MyLabel’ accessed from a thread other than the thread it was created on.

This is how you update UI controls from background worker.

public void UpdateLabel(string text)
{
MyLabel.Invoke((Action)(() => MyLabel.Text = text));
   MyLabel.Invoke((Action)(() => MyLabel.Update()));
 }

 

Using SQL Parameters for Insert statement.

Sometimes you need to insert a data to your database. Here is the safer way to insert a row using SQL parameter.
Passing parameters to SQL prevents you build dynamic SQL statement. Building a dynamic SQL statement is a security risk such as SQL injection.
Here is the sample code for insert statement using parameters.

public void InsertRowToDatabaseUsingParams()
 {
//create SQL connection.
using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
 {
//open sql connection.
conn.Open();
string sqlCommand = "Insert into TestTable (column1,column2) Values(@column1,@column2);";

using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sqlCommand, conn))
{
//add column value to parameters of SqlCommand
SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter("@column1", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50);
param.Value ="value1";
cmd.Parameters.Add(param);

param =new SqlParameter("@column2", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50);
param.Value ="value2";
cmd.Parameters.Add(param);

//Process
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

}
}
}

Kyoungsu Do
Software Developer
ImageSource, Inc.