How to Increase ECM Team Efficiency

In the course of doing some work for one of our partners – we were asked to take a look at the existing workload for their ECM team.  This particular ECM team has done a great job maintaining and integrating ECM components from a variety of vendors.  As typical in such an environment – we found that everyone on the team had primary support duties for at least one component, and was involved in customer support issues or updating /enhancing one or more of the company’s ECM products on pretty much a daily basis.  Continue reading

How to minify your JavaScript files and why you shouldn’t wait

It is common in fast responsive web apps to minify JavaScript files to reduce file size and increase app performance.

What is it?
Minification means to remove all unnecessary characters (e.g. comments, spacing, line breaks, shortening names, etc.) from a JavaScript file so that the resulting file behaves the same but is much more compact.

Why should you minify your JavaScript files?
Here are some benefits:
– Faster load speed
– Small files and cache size
– Less demand on your web server
– Uses less bandwidth especially on mobile devices

How to minify your JavaScript files with two popular tools: Continue reading

How to: Get Image Page Count in .NET C#

How to get image page count in .NET C#

private int GetTotalpages(string filePath)
{
int pageCount = 0;
using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{
using (Image temp = Image.FromStream(fs))
{
pageCount = temp.GetFrameCount(System.Drawing.Imaging.FrameDimension.Page);
}
}

return pageCount;
}

KyoungSu Do
Software Developer
ImageSource, Inc.

Creating Case Insensitive Dictionaries In .NET

For millennia, mankind has looked to the stars and wondered, “How can I create a generic Dictionary in .NET that allows me use case insensitive strings as keys?” Well today that age old question will be answered with this neat trick.

Simply put, all you need to do is add a StringComparer object when constructing a generic Dictionary that uses a string key, and make sure to use on of the IgnoreCase StringComparers that are offered. Below is some sample code to illustrate just how easy this is.

// Create a generic dictionary with a string comparer that ignores case sensitivity.
//
// This includes the following:
//  - CurrentCultureIgnoreCase
//  - InvariantCultureIgnoreCase
//  - OrdinalIgnoreCase
Dictionary<string, string> stringMap = 
     new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
stringMap.Add("Test Key", "Some value");

// Now try to access or change the corresponding value with the key.
// The case of the key string no longer matters.
stringMap["test key"] = "This will work";
stringMap["TEST KEY"] = "And also this";
stringMap["tEsT kEy"] = "And this as well";
stringMap["tEST kEY"] = "And finally this";

// This can be done with any dictionary that uses a string as the key
Dictionary<string, int> numberMap = 
     new Dictionary<string, int>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
numberMap.Add("Test Key", 0);

// Same deal here, you can use any case to get or set the values in the map
numberMap["test key"] = 1;
numberMap["TEST KEY"] = 2;
numberMap["tEsT kEy"] = 3;
numberMap["tEST kEY"] = 4;

And that’s all there is to it.  I hope you enjoy and find this useful.

Richard Franzen
Developer
ImageSource, Inc.