Steve Jobs and Promoting Insanely Great Software Quality

“You can’t just ask customers what they want and then try to give that to them. By the time you get it built, they’ll want something new.” (Steve Jobs, 1989)

“You‘ve got to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology – not the other way around.” (Steve Jobs, 1997)

“[If you’re lucky, when you grow up you’ll discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you and you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use.” (Steve Jobs, 1994)

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Few people in recent history have made the impression Steve Jobs did. He was a thunderous, hypersonic force in a world of (relatively speaking) slow-motion quiet, leaving behind a vibrant legacy of astonishing dimensions and changing not only the way people communicate, but the very way people think about communicating in the world of information interchange.

The first two quotes highlight the difficulty of transforming a process/idea into mass-marketable software. Further, they show that for the past twenty years or so, the process of building software has not changed appreciably. One can search the Internet, scanning for the one definitive article that outlines the perfect strategy and methodology for software development, marketing and deployment. With the millions of people working diligently the past twenty-plus years in the tech world to codify any and all matters, it seems that would be doable. OK. Go ahead and look. I’ll wait. And, if the past is any indicator of future performance, twenty years from now I’ll still be waiting and you’ll be howling, foaming-at-the-mouth mad, surrounded by seriously alarming piles of used, fermenting pizza boxes and empty soda bottles. And the only one who will still love you is your Mom. Maybe. Software development can be likened to being chased by a rabid Rottweiler while trying to catch an over-amped cat jonesing for tuna when you have one leg in a cast and the cat isn’t inclined to be caught and the Rottweiler seriously wants to turn your good leg into its new, favorite chew toy, you know? Continue reading

Serialization and Deserialization

Serialization is a process of converting an object into a stream of data, to easily transfer over the network or to save to disk.   So, using this concept of serialization, we can serialize any object to XML string.
Here is a person class that we can serialize.


Here is the code that takes the person object into string of xml format.

Using Serialization in .NET is provided by the System.Runtim.Serialization name space.

Once you have the XML string, now you can save it to disk, store it into database, or transfer over the network.
Here is the deserialization method that takes serialized string of XML into the person object.

Kyoungsu Do
Software Quality Engineer
ImageSource, Inc. 

 

COLD

COLD is an industry acronym for Computer Output to Laser Disc. If that sounds Old and Dated, it’s because it has been around for many years, even though Laser Disc is no longer in common usage in the industry.

The idea behind the Laser Disc is an implementation of WORM technology (Write Once, Read Many). This type of storage is ideal for long-term storage of static data like invoices, customer records, monthly or weekly status reports. The idea is that this data is not subject to updating, only reading, and not necessarily a lot of reading.
Companies and organizations have a need for archiving off their data periodically and COLD is a way to do this.
Wikipedia reports:

In 1979, the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago opened their "Newspaper" exhibit which used interactive Laserdiscs to allow visitors to search for the front page of any Chicago Tribune newspaper. This was a very early use of digitally interactive technology in Museums and could even be among the first.

Think about how ubiquitous access to archived materials is today.
The devices used to store the data are different today (Laserdisc is pretty rare), but the idea is still around. COLD is often times referred to Enterprise Report Management (or ERM).