Please don’t make this mistake in your business. It will RUIN you.

This is so true…lest we forget the importance of feedback, especially from our customer.

Please don’t make this mistake in your business. It will RUIN you.

by Derek Halpern | Follow Him on Twitter Here

Every now and then, you stumble on something that makes you want to hit your head against the wall.

And it’s often when people make a large, glaring mistake. A mistake that should be self explanatory, but they make it anyway.

Here’s the full story…

Over on Facebook, I republished my video about why I think discounting is for idiots. And someone shared their opinion of my video:

bob

Now this is remarkable.

First, let’s talk about the big elephant in the room. They tell me I’m an idiot, and that they suggest businesses LIE to their customers.

But that’s not even the main point.

Instead, they’re not paying any mind to what I’m sharing because they don’t agree with it.

I’m not surprised by this though. There’s something known as selective exposure theory in psychology, and the long and short of it is: people look for information that affirms their pre-existing beliefs instead of contradicts them.

Now here’s the thing:

The mistake I’m sharing with you today has nothing to do with discounting. And it has nothing to do with lying.

Instead…

When you’re running your business, you should NEVER – and I mean NEVER – shoot down the advice of other people. Even if you think it doesn’t apply to you. Even if you think the other person is wrong.

Now this doesn’t mean you should believe everything you read.

Far from it.

I’m cynical. And skeptical. And everything I read, I take with a grain of salt. However, no matter how smart or dumb people sound, I always approach every scenario with the mindset of, “What can I learn from this?”

That’s why I read books about art history, copywriting, memoirs of fashion executives, and more.

Even if something doesn’t apply to me, I make it apply.

And that’s the secret.

If someone presents something to you that contracts what you know, you don’t have to change your mind and believe them. But you should ask yourself, “What do they know that I don’t?”

Even in this example, maybe they know something about discounting that I don’t. And even if they don’t, I still used their comments as a teachable moment for you.

So from this point forward, I implore you to never make the mistake this person made. I want you to use every experience as an opportunity to learn something new. Because in my experience, the best ideas comes from the dumbest things.

And I don’t want you to miss out on any of it.

Now here’s what I want you to do…

What’s one comment or critique you’ve received in your business (or life) that you didn’t agree with. How can you turn that into a teachable moment or a lesson? Leave a comment.

You can read the original article here.

Best Regards,

Robert Hughet
Quality Assurance Mgr.
ImageSource, Inc.

User experience design

Here’s an inspiration article about how to design a smartphone in a few minutes from Sami.

I especially like the last part about what it meant to design for the users.  It is not about throwing a bunch of features together and calling it a product, it’s about thought-out, fully vetted features that package in a nice and usable UI.

 

Building Out Distributed Apps (Big Data)

Yesterday, I attended a webinar by O’Reilly on how to reduce the pain of building out distributed applications. The focus was on scalability, which makes sense, since this is why you would want to distribute your applications.

Apart from the host’s unfortunate resemblance to Little Lord Fauntleroy, there was some interesting observations to be made. To wit:

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Is Microsoft Changing Strategies On Silverlight?

This article was recently posted on ZDNet, detailing Microsoft’s diminished mentioning of Silverlight in their keynote.  From the article, it sounds like Microsoft is positioning Silverlight to become their mobile development platform, with HTML5 becoming their main cross-platform focus.

This change in focus correlates with the increased popularity of Apple’s iOS platform.  It makes some sense that Microsoft would want to avoid have a proprietary development platform on iOS, as Apple has been pretty hostile toward’s Adobe’s Flash platform.  I don’t see the longtime rival acting any differently towards Microsoft.  In this instance, HTML5 makes more sense when attempting to reach the populous iOS market.

If you wish to discuss Silverlight, HTML5 and iOS development with employees of ImageSource, come visit us at Nexus.

 

Microsoft.Practices.Unity Library

Recently, a development effort at ImageSource involved use of the Microsoft.Practices.Unity library, a part of the Microsoft Patterns & Practices.  The Unity piece provides tools for more modular, component based application design.  It provides simplified object creation and ability to specify object dependencies and parameters at runtime.  While I am still researching all that Unity can do, it looks like a very interesting and exciting new way to create component based applications.

For more information, see the MSDN Article about the Microsoft.Practices.Unity library.