Moving To The Cloud

For some interesting reading, range about the Internet for articles detailing the way the software world has changed in the past few years with the success of companies like Facebook and similarly ubiquitous, social-node technologies. Those companies have fostered the advent of the DevOps strategy, which is more a paradigm shift in corporate culture than merely a mechanical development/quality assurance/deployment strategy, and it demonstrates a new way of thinking about deployment scaling using the cloud (with an unbelievable number of servers available) while maintaining an aggressive development schedule. Sprint-cycle application development and cloud-based deployment are the order of the day for these newer entities. No longer does dev sit in a development cycle of a year or more, but rather a cycle that is measured in months at most, or weeks – even days. Getting customer-requested features quickly into the product and out to the customers is still job one, but – Oh, hey! – the difference in implementation! Ben Horowitz Article “How Software Testing Has Changed”
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Please don’t make this mistake in your business. It will RUIN you.

This is so true…lest we forget the importance of feedback, especially from our customer.

Please don’t make this mistake in your business. It will RUIN you.

by Derek Halpern | Follow Him on Twitter Here

Every now and then, you stumble on something that makes you want to hit your head against the wall.

And it’s often when people make a large, glaring mistake. A mistake that should be self explanatory, but they make it anyway.

Here’s the full story…

Over on Facebook, I republished my video about why I think discounting is for idiots. And someone shared their opinion of my video:

bob

Now this is remarkable.

First, let’s talk about the big elephant in the room. They tell me I’m an idiot, and that they suggest businesses LIE to their customers.

But that’s not even the main point.

Instead, they’re not paying any mind to what I’m sharing because they don’t agree with it.

I’m not surprised by this though. There’s something known as selective exposure theory in psychology, and the long and short of it is: people look for information that affirms their pre-existing beliefs instead of contradicts them.

Now here’s the thing:

The mistake I’m sharing with you today has nothing to do with discounting. And it has nothing to do with lying.

Instead…

When you’re running your business, you should NEVER – and I mean NEVER – shoot down the advice of other people. Even if you think it doesn’t apply to you. Even if you think the other person is wrong.

Now this doesn’t mean you should believe everything you read.

Far from it.

I’m cynical. And skeptical. And everything I read, I take with a grain of salt. However, no matter how smart or dumb people sound, I always approach every scenario with the mindset of, “What can I learn from this?”

That’s why I read books about art history, copywriting, memoirs of fashion executives, and more.

Even if something doesn’t apply to me, I make it apply.

And that’s the secret.

If someone presents something to you that contracts what you know, you don’t have to change your mind and believe them. But you should ask yourself, “What do they know that I don’t?”

Even in this example, maybe they know something about discounting that I don’t. And even if they don’t, I still used their comments as a teachable moment for you.

So from this point forward, I implore you to never make the mistake this person made. I want you to use every experience as an opportunity to learn something new. Because in my experience, the best ideas comes from the dumbest things.

And I don’t want you to miss out on any of it.

Now here’s what I want you to do…

What’s one comment or critique you’ve received in your business (or life) that you didn’t agree with. How can you turn that into a teachable moment or a lesson? Leave a comment.

You can read the original article here.

Best Regards,

Robert Hughet
Quality Assurance Mgr.
ImageSource, Inc.

Organizing Using Directives in Visual Studio

When it comes to removing and sorting unused using directives in the Visual Studio Editor, a useful feature that is not enabled by default is to place all System directives on the top.

Here’s what it looks like with the option disabled:
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And here’s one with the option enabled:
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Step 1: Turn on the option
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Step 2: Use the “Remove and Sort” option
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Phong Hoang
Director of Development
ImageSource, Inc.

How To Add Or Change XML Encoding With .NET

Last time I wrote about comparing XML strings in .NET, and continuing that theme I’d like to discuss another handy XML trick.  As the last article pointed out, not all XML strings are created equal.  In fact, sometimes they are missing the necessary XML version and encoding information, like in the following sample XML:

<SampleXML>
    <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2 value="test value" />
    <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3>
</SampleXML>

Notice anything missing?   Yes, the declaration information is not at the start of the XML string.  Declaration information like in the below example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

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How to minify your JavaScript files and why you shouldn’t wait

It is common in fast responsive web apps to minify JavaScript files to reduce file size and increase app performance.

What is it?
Minification means to remove all unnecessary characters (e.g. comments, spacing, line breaks, shortening names, etc.) from a JavaScript file so that the resulting file behaves the same but is much more compact.

Why should you minify your JavaScript files?
Here are some benefits:
– Faster load speed
– Small files and cache size
– Less demand on your web server
– Uses less bandwidth especially on mobile devices

How to minify your JavaScript files with two popular tools: Continue reading

Is it a batch, a document, a page or a file?

“The ability to save compound documents blurs the definition of “pages”, which is sometimes confusing for knowledge workers.”

The ILINX product suite, as well as most content management systems, saves content in batches. A batch can contain one or more documents and a document can contain one or more pages.

“This made complete sense when we we’re all saving only TIFF images.”

ILINX has the ability to store diverse file types in a single compound document. This includes standard image file formats along with virtually any type of electronic document, such as Microsoft ® Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Text, Video, audio, web content, etc. What used to be pages in a document may now include, as an example, a single page TIFF, a Word document with 35 pages, and a PowerPoint document with 12 pages, all combined into and saved as a single compound document that displays as three pages when indexing.

“We just might have to think about revising our terminology to keep up with all the advances in content management.”

Robert Hughet
Quality Assurance Mgr.
ImageSource, Inc.

How to run SQL code against an Oracle databse

Context: ILINX Capture, ILINX Release and Oracle IPM 11g

Problem: A customer wanted the ability to run some custom SQL code against an Oracle database after a doc has been released to Oracle IPM 11g.

Solution: Place the built-in DatabaseLookup IXM after Release and use the return value from Release to call Oracle. Below is a screen shot of the workflow:

phong

Phong Hoang
Development Manager
ImageSource, Inc.