How To Add Or Change XML Encoding With .NET

Last time I wrote about comparing XML strings in .NET, and continuing that theme I’d like to discuss another handy XML trick.  As the last article pointed out, not all XML strings are created equal.  In fact, sometimes they are missing the necessary XML version and encoding information, like in the following sample XML:

<SampleXML>
    <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2 value="test value" />
    <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3>
</SampleXML>

Notice anything missing?   Yes, the declaration information is not at the start of the XML string.  Declaration information like in the below example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

Continue reading

7 Principles for Creating a Successful Digital Workplace

ImageSource has partnered with dozens of customers of every size and across all industries to fine-tune our unique ECM-Ecosystem offering. This powerful engagement helps organizations to clearly understand where they are underserved by their current content management technologies, what their optimal content management objectives should be, and lays out a series of steps to get customers on track with a meaningful content management strategy. The five steps to the ImageSource ECM-Ecosystem are:

1. Understand the business problem/challenge
2. Identify gaps and opportunities for improvement
3. Provide a business vision
4. Define technology requirements
5. Define the business value

I recently ran across a great article by Elizabeth Marsh wherein she lays out 7 key principles in creating a successful “digital workplace” strategy. These same principles are woven throughout the ImageSource ECM-Ecosystem but Elizabeth did such a good job describing them that I thought I would share them here. So later this week, grab a slab of leftover turkey and pile of stuffing, cozy up to a warm fire, and share these insightful tidbits with family and friends – they’ll be glad you did!

Build Digital Workplaces Fit for the Future
http://www.cmswire.com/cms/social-business/build-digital-workplaces-fit-for-the-future-027113.php
By Elizabeth Marsh  |  Nov 25, 2014

Randy Weakly
VP of Software Development
ImageSource, Inc.

The Internet Just Isn’t That Big a Deal Yet: A Hard Look at Solow’s Paradox

An interesting and relevant article from Lifesize’s Simon Dudley.

The Internet Just Isn’t That Big a Deal Yet: A Hard Look at Solow’s Paradox
Robert Solow, Winner of the Noble Prize in Economics in 1987.

Robert Solow, Winner of the Noble Prize in Economics in 1987.

The Internet age has given us blisteringly fast connectivity to the World Wide Web, cloud computing, nearly instant collaboration and high definition face-to-face video communication with our peers around the world. Yet in terms of our rate of economic productivity, we have not only stalled in the past several years but also taken hugely dramatic dips. The promise of the Internet making everyone’s job easier and boosting economic advancement has not been met. Why?

The answer lies in a closer look at Solow’s Paradox. The concept was first described in 1987 by economist and author Robert Solow, who stated, “You can see the computer age everywhere but in the productivity statistics.” As it grew in popularity, Solow’s Paradox became defined as the “discrepancy between measures of investment in information technology and measures of output at the national level.” In particular, it asks why the rate of productivity increase appears to be slowing dramatically in the Internet age.

And that is undeniably true. According to an early November report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014’s third quarter business sector labor productivity increased at a 2.0 percent annual rate. Output increased 4.4 percent and hours worked increased 2.3 percent. From the third quarter of 2013 to the third quarter of 2014, productivity rose 0.9 percent as output and hours worked increased 3.0 percent and 2.1 percent, respectively. Continue reading

What you need to know when migrating off Oracle IPM 10g

The last version of the Oracle IPM 10g product baseline reaches the end of Premier Support in just a couple of months. All previous versions including those from Stellent and Optika are no longer supported. I wanted to send along some information that might be helpful in understanding the Oracle support lifecycle, support dates, and some high level information about migrating off of the IPM 10g platform.

The Oracle Fusion Middleware Support lifecycle has three phases:
1) Premier Support – in this phase Oracle provides:
• New “dot” release versions with bug fixes and enhancements
• Standard break/fix patching
• Certifications for new database, operating systems, Office versions etc.
• Technical Support (phone/web/email)

2) Extended Support (additional support fees may apply) – in this phase Oracle provides:
• NO new “dot” release versions or enhancements
• Standard break/fix patching
• NO certifications for new database, operating systems, Office versions etc.
• Technical Support (phone/web/email)

3) Lifetime/Sustaining Support – in this phase Oracle provides:
• NO new “dot” release versions
• NO standard break/fix patching
• NO certifications for new database, operating systems, Office versions etc.
• Technical Support (phone/web/email) Continue reading

How to minify your JavaScript files and why you shouldn’t wait

It is common in fast responsive web apps to minify JavaScript files to reduce file size and increase app performance.

What is it?
Minification means to remove all unnecessary characters (e.g. comments, spacing, line breaks, shortening names, etc.) from a JavaScript file so that the resulting file behaves the same but is much more compact.

Why should you minify your JavaScript files?
Here are some benefits:
– Faster load speed
– Small files and cache size
– Less demand on your web server
– Uses less bandwidth especially on mobile devices

How to minify your JavaScript files with two popular tools: Continue reading

How to Compare XML Strings Using .NET

So you want to compare two XML strings together to see if they are equal. Obviously, it would be easy to just compare the two strings using a regular string equality comparison and call it a day. However, what if the XML strings looked like the following:

<SampleXML>
    <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2 value="test value" />
    <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3>
</SampleXML>
<SampleXML>
        <SampleField1>Testing</SampleField1>
    <SampleField2     value="test value" />
        <SampleField3 type="int">456</SampleField3></SampleXML>

All of the nodes, attributes and values are the same, but the formatting is way off. Obviously, a string equality comparison between these two would return false. Is there anything that can be done about this? Not to fear, .NET provides a pretty simple solution. Continue reading

Is it a batch, a document, a page or a file?

“The ability to save compound documents blurs the definition of “pages”, which is sometimes confusing for knowledge workers.”

The ILINX product suite, as well as most content management systems, saves content in batches. A batch can contain one or more documents and a document can contain one or more pages.

“This made complete sense when we we’re all saving only TIFF images.”

ILINX has the ability to store diverse file types in a single compound document. This includes standard image file formats along with virtually any type of electronic document, such as Microsoft ® Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Text, Video, audio, web content, etc. What used to be pages in a document may now include, as an example, a single page TIFF, a Word document with 35 pages, and a PowerPoint document with 12 pages, all combined into and saved as a single compound document that displays as three pages when indexing.

“We just might have to think about revising our terminology to keep up with all the advances in content management.”

Robert Hughet
Quality Assurance Mgr.
ImageSource, Inc.